All Relations between facial expression recognition and inferior frontal gyrus

Reference Sentence Publish Date Extraction Date Species
Christiana Butera, Jonas Kaplan, Emily Kilroy, Laura Harrison, Aditya Jayashankar, Fernanda Loureiro, Lisa Aziz-Zade. The relationship between alexithymia, interoception, and neural functional connectivity during facial expression processing in autism spectrum disorder. Neuropsychologia vol issue 2023 36610493 in the asd group, the degree of interoceptive sensation felt during emotion was positively correlated with left ventral anterior insula-right ifg connectivity when viewing facial expressions. 2023-01-07 2023-01-08 Not clear
Michel Belyk, Steven Brown, Sonja A Kot. Demonstration and validation of Kernel Density Estimation for spatial meta-analyses in cognitive neuroscience using simulated data. Data in brief vol 13 issue 2020 28664169 the data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "convergence of semantics and emotional expression within the ifg pars orbitalis" (belyk et al., 2017) [1]. 2020-09-30 2022-01-13 Not clear
Michel Belyk, Steven Brown, Jessica Lim, Sonja A Kot. Convergence of semantics and emotional expression within the IFG pars orbitalis. NeuroImage vol 156 issue 2018 28400265 convergence of semantics and emotional expression within the ifg pars orbitalis. 2018-04-26 2022-01-13 Not clear
Shota Uono, Wataru Sato, Takanori Kochiyama, Reiko Sawada, Yasutaka Kubota, Sayaka Yoshimura, Motomi Toich. Neural substrates of the ability to recognize facial expressions: a voxel-based morphometry study. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience vol 12 issue 3 2017 27672176 the gray matter volume of the right ifg positively correlated with the total accuracy of facial expression recognition. 2017-10-16 2022-01-12 Not clear
Shota Uono, Wataru Sato, Takanori Kochiyama, Reiko Sawada, Yasutaka Kubota, Sayaka Yoshimura, Motomi Toich. Neural substrates of the ability to recognize facial expressions: a voxel-based morphometry study. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience vol 12 issue 3 2017 27672176 this suggests that individual differences in the ability to recognize facial expressions are associated with differences in the structure of the right ifg. 2017-10-16 2022-01-12 Not clear
Shota Uono, Wataru Sato, Takanori Kochiyama, Reiko Sawada, Yasutaka Kubota, Sayaka Yoshimura, Motomi Toich. Neural substrates of the ability to recognize facial expressions: a voxel-based morphometry study. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience vol 12 issue 3 2017 27672176 previous functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that some brain regions, such as the inferior frontal gyrus (ifg), are active during the response to emotional facial expressions in healthy participants, and lesion studies have demonstrated that damage to these structures impairs the recognition of facial expressions. 2017-10-16 2022-01-12 Not clear
Tessa R Flack, Timothy J Andrews, Mark Hymers, Mohammed Al-Mosaiwi, Samuel P Marsden, James W A Strachan, Chayanit Trakulpipat, Liang Wang, Tian Wu, Andrew W Youn. Responses in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus show a feature-based response to facial expression. Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior vol 69 issue 2016 25967084 in contrast to the psts, a holistic pattern of response to facial expression was found in the right inferior frontal gyrus (ifg). 2016-05-05 2022-01-12 Not clear
Ellen Ji, Cynthia Shannon Weickert, Rhoshel Lenroot, Stanley V Catts, Ans Vercammen, Christopher White, Raquel E Gur, Thomas W Weicker. Endogenous testosterone levels are associated with neural activity in men with schizophrenia during facial emotion processing. Behavioural brain research vol 286 issue 2016 25796490 this study provides the first evidence that circulating serum testosterone levels are related to ifg activation during emotion face processing in men with schizophrenia but not in healthy men, which suggests that testosterone levels modulate neural processes relevant to facial emotion processing that may interfere with social functioning in men with schizophrenia. 2016-01-04 2022-01-12 Not clear
Apostolos Papazacharias, Paolo Taurisano, Leonardo Fazio, Barbara Gelao, Annabella Di Giorgio, Luciana Lo Bianco, Tiziana Quarto, Marina Mancini, Annamaria Porcelli, Raffaella Romano, Grazia Caforio, Orlando Todarello, Teresa Popolizio, Giuseppe Blasi, Alessandro Bertolin. Aversive emotional interference impacts behavior and prefronto-striatal activity during increasing attentional control. Frontiers in behavioral neuroscience vol 9 issue 2015 25954172 results indicated slower reaction time (rt) and greater right ifg activity when fearful compared with neutral facial expressions preceded the low level of attentional control. 2015-05-08 2022-01-12 Not clear
Ryo Kitada, Yuko Okamoto, Akihiro T Sasaki, Takanori Kochiyama, Motohide Miyahara, Susan J Lederman, Norihiro Sadat. Early visual experience and the recognition of basic facial expressions: involvement of the middle temporal and inferior frontal gyri during haptic identification by the early blind. Frontiers in human neuroscience vol 7 issue 2013 23372547 moreover, the inferior frontal gyrus (ifg) and posterior superior temporal sulcus (psts) in the sighted subjects are involved in haptic and visual recognition of facial expressions. 2013-02-04 2022-01-12 Not clear
Christiaan van der Gaag, Ruud B Minderaa, Christian Keyser. Facial expressions: what the mirror neuron system can and cannot tell us. Social neuroscience vol 2 issue 3-4 2008 18633816 the inferior frontal gyrus (ifg) and posterior parietal cortex have been considered to compose a mirror neuron system (mns) for the motor components of facial expressions, while the amygdala and insula may represent an "additional" mns for emotional states. 2008-12-12 2022-01-13 Not clear
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